Astronomy as a Hobby

I had an interest in space since watching on television the Apollo Missions back in the 1960's that led to Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin in Apollo 11 being the 1st men to land on the moon. I started reading the "Observer Book of Astronomy" (ISBN 750.662 1962) written by the late "Patrick Moore in 1962 at junior school and pestering my parents for a telescope. They bought for me a small Greenkat telescope as my first telescope to view the skies at night and my Dad made a platform for his step ladder to put it on. With this small telescope I viewed the planet Saturn for the first time and its rings, it looked like a small "fried egg" in space. I also saw Jupiter and some of its moons and wanted to see more.

Moon SkyWatcher 200 GreenKat Telescope
From left to right: Moon taken with a Canon EOS350D and my 200P, SkyWatcher 200P Telescope, My Old GreenKat Telescope,

The small Greenkat telescope as my first telescope. I always wanted a proper telescope for astronomy ever since. Recently I have bought myself a Skywatcher 200p (200mm) Astronomical Reflector Telescope to view the sky at night. I would like to add the motorisation to it to do some astrophotography with the DLSR and also use a webcam modified for telescope use. Still early days and the weather has been so poor of late I've not had any chance to even casually observe. This is the first Moon picture I took with this telescope, the photo of the moon was taken with my Canon EOS350D on the T adaptor on the focuser.

During March 2016 Jupiter was rising in the East and by opening my conservatory doors I was able to try and capture a photo. I had no motor tracking but placing my Canon EOS350 DSLR on the Tee adaptor and the x2 Barlow Lens I captured this image using ISO 100 at 1/20 sec. I was pleased to some rings/bands and the famous "Red Spot" is visible on the lower band just to the right of centre when you zoom in. The 1st photo was with my iPhone held up to the eyepiece the previous day as the camera had a flat battery

Jupiter Jupiter
From left to right: Jupiter via iPhone and then Jupiter via Canon EOS350